Temple

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관련항목 페이징
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Chinese Characters 寺刹
Alternative name Sarhgharama , Temple , Buddhist Temple
Field Religion/Buddhism
Type Conceptual Term/Conceptual Term (General)
Area Uiseong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do
Period Contemporary/Contemporary
Writer Jo Sudong
[Definition]
Places where people worship Buddha and study Buddhism in Uiseong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.

[Summary]
Temples are called Garam as well, and Garam is a contraction of Seunggaram, the transliteration of the Sanskrit, saṃgha-ārāma. Temples were originally built as places for Buddha to be summoned, however, they became a place for Buddhist retreats as orders were formed. Thus, temples became places for asceticism for people who entered the Buddhist priesthood, and comprehensive residences for Buddhist priests and nuns, and male and female believers, where various rituals took place.

The first temples in Korea were Chomunsa Temple and Ibullansa Temple founded in 372 (the 2nd year of King Sosurim’s reign in the Goguryeo Dynasty). The key features of temples are a main building, where Buddha is enshrined, and a pagoda. The main hall is named variously, Daeungjeon, Amitajeon and Daejeokgwangjeon depending on which Buddha is enshrined. Apart from the main hall, palaces such as Gwaneumjeon, Yaksajeon, Jijangjeon and Myeongbujeon, and mountain god shrines, Taoist shrines, Nabanjonja shrines, bell houses, drum houses, Zen houses and monastic dormitory Yosachae are constituent parts of temples.

According to research by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in 2010, the number of registered temples in Korea is 8,777, and the number of traditional temples among those is 938.

[Current State]
There are 105 Buddhist orders operating in Korea at present. The number of Buddhist orders which belong to the Association of Korean Buddhist Orders established in 1989 is 27. At present, there are 49 temples including 9 traditional temples in the Uiseong area. The traditional temples including Jeongsusa Temple [Gucheon-myeon, Uiseong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do], Sujeongsa Temple [Geumseong-myeon], Daegoksa Temple [Dain-myeon], Gounsa Temple [Danchon-myeon], Manjangsa Temple [Bian-myeon], Juwolsa Temple [Sagok-myeon], Jijangsa Temple [Ansa-myoen], Oknyeonsa Temple [Anpyeong-myeon] and Unnamsa Temple [Anpyeong-myeon] belong to the Korean Buddhist Jogye Order. If we look at the current state of the temples in Uiseong area, 46 temples overall belong to the Korean Buddhist Jogye Order [20], Korean Buddhist Taego Order [8], Korean Buddhist Cheontae Order [1], Korean Buddhist Jodong Order [1], Won Buddhism [1], Korean Buddhist Wonhyo Order [2], Korean Buddhist Jingak Order [2], Korean Buddhist Jeongto Order [2], Sambo Jogye Order [1], Seongdeokdo [1] and an independent order [1] .

The temples that belong to the Korean Buddhist Jogye Order are Gwaneumsa Temple, Jagwangsa Temple, Daehwasa Temple, Bogwangsa Temple and Yurigwangsa Temple in Uiseong-eup, Uiseong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Gounsa Temple in Danchon-myeon, Unyongsa Temple and Okseongam in Oksan-myeon, Juwolsa Temple in Sagok-myeon, Sujeongsa Temple in Geumseong-myeon, Myoseonam and Bongrimsa Temple in Bongyang-myeon, Seokbulsa Temple and Manjangsa Temple in Bian-myeon, Jeongsusa Temple in Gucheon-myeon, Yongheungsa Temple in Angye-myeon, Daegoksa Temple in Dain-myeon, Oknyeonsa Temple and Unnamsa Temple in Anpyeong-myeon and Jijangsa Temple in Ansa-myeon.

The temples that belong to the Korean Buddhist Taego Order are Mitasa Temple and Cheonyongsa Temple in Uiseong-eup, Gwaneumsa Temple and Haknimsa Temple in Jeomgok-myeon, Geumtapsa Temple and Boeunsa Temple in Geumseong-myeon, Cheoneunsa Temple in Danmil-myeon and Gaecheonsa Temple in Angye-myeon.

The temples that belong to the Korean Buddhist Beophwa Order are Sudosa Temple and Sanbulsa Temple in Uiseong-eup, Deungyongsa Temple in Danchon-myeon, Daeheungsa Temple in Chunsan-myeon, Baekamsa Temple in Gaeum-myeon and Cheongnyongsa Temple in Bongyang-myeon.

The temple that belongs to the Korean Buddhist Cheontae Order is Wolyongsa Temple in Uiseong-eup.

The temple that belongs to the Korean Buddhist Jodong Order is Odoam in Gaeum-myeon.

The temples that belong to the Korean Buddhist Wonhyo Order are Songnimsa Temple in Danmil-myeon and Jaosa Temple in Angye-myeon.

The temples that belong to the Korean Buddhist Jingak Order are Simindang and Yongcheonsa Temple in Bian-myeon.

The temples that belong to the Korean Buddhist Jeongto Order are Dongmyeongsa Temple in Danmil-myeon and Wolcheonsa Temple in Danbuk-myeon.

The temple that belongs to the Sambo Jogye Order is Dongnyeonsa Temple in Uiseong-eup.

The temple that belongs to Won Buddism is Uiseong Won Buddhism in Uiseong-eup.

The temple that belongs to Seongdeokdo is Seongdeokdo in Anpyeong-myeon.

The independent temple is Seonamsa Temple in Uiseong-eup.

According to Uiseong Gunji published in 1987, the numbers of registered temples in the region are 12 from the Jogye Order, 4 from the Taego Order, 3 from the Beophwa Order, 1 from the Jingak Order, 1 from the Wonhyo Order, 1 from Won Buddhism and 1 independent temple, and the total number of temples including unregistered ones is 35. The number of monks was 42, the number of buildings was 135 and the number of Buddhists was 12,764. According to Uiseong Gunji published in 1998, the number of temples was 46, the number of monks was 61, the number of buildings was 179 and the number of Buddhists was 14,980, and this shows an increase in the number of temples, monks and believers.

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